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Run247 8 WEEK 10km Training Schedule

by Editor
Sunday 11th November 2012
 
 

8 WEEK 10km Training Schedule

50 minute 10k

Unfortunately, these schedules do not come with any guarantee of what your finishing time will be but for our purposes we suggest that 50 minutes should be achievable.

Q. How do you eat an elephant sandwich?
A. One bite at a time.

The same principle applies to any beginner thinking of preparing themselves for their first-ever 10k race: an ideal distance compared to the trials of a marathon and the hectic pace of a 5k.

In this instance, beginner refers to someone who has been running for recreational purposes only and runs three or four times a week for a total of between 10 and 12 miles. It is also assumed they are able run some three miles at any pace without stopping.

It is recommended that these schedules are not attempted until you are at the above level of fitness.

When following these schedules, remember that they are not cast in stone. If you miss a day or are feeling either tired or an injury coming on do not worry.

If circumstances mean that a complete week is missed, just start again from where you left off.

A tip for race day: At this stage your confidence could be high but do not get carried away with too fast a start. Aim to cover each kilometre in five minutes to reach your target of 50min. If achieved, you can make use of the ‘faster’ schedules to raise your game.


WEEK ONE - An easy week to get you into the habit of maintaining a schedule
Monday Rest
Tuesday 2 miles easy
Wednesday 2 miles easy
Thursday Rest
Friday 2 miles easy
Saturday Rest
Sunday 4 miles easy

WEEK TWO - Speed work introduced to get used to raising the pulse rate
Monday Rest
Tuesday 3 miles easy
Wednesday Warm up with 10min of easy jogging. Run 2 x 800m at a pace 50 per cent quicker than you easy run. Walk or jog 400m between both 800m. Warm down with an 800m jog
Thursday Rest
Friday 3 miles easy
Saturday 2 miles easy
Sunday 4 miles easy

WEEK THREE - Much as WEEK TWO but a tempo run is now added
Monday Rest
Tuesday 3 miles easy
Wednesday Warm up with 10min of easy jogging. Run 4 x 400 at a pace quicker than your 800m efforts. Slow jog for 400m in between each effort. Warm down with an 800m jog
Thursday Rest
Friday 3 miles easy
Saturday 2 miles tempo run
Sunday 5 miles easy

WEEK FOUR - Both the speed element and the mileage is now on the increase
Monday Rest
Tuesday Run 4 miles easy
Wednesday Fartlek: 20min run. Easy 5min run then alternate with 60sec fast and 60sec easy with easy run for final 2min
Thursday Rest
Friday 4 miles easy
Saturday 3 miles tempo run or 5km race
Sunday 5 miles easy

WEEK FIVE - Much the same mileage with a pace judgement track session added
Monday Rest
Tuesday 4 miles easy
Wednesday Warm up with 10 minutes of easy jogging and run 2x1600 metres (4 laps of a running track). Attempt each 1600m in 9 minutesthis is close to your targeted 50 minute 10k pace. Slow walk for 400m between each 1600m. Finish with two laps of easy jogging
Thursday Rest
Friday 4 miles easy
Saturday 3 miles tempo run
Sunday 5 miles easy

WEEK SIX - Speedier interval session plus a six-mile run introduced
Monday Rest
Tuesday 5 miles easy
Wednesday Warm up with 10 minutes of easy jogging and then run 4x800 metres in 4 minutes for each 800m this is faster than your 50min 10k pace. Slow jog for 400m between each 800m. Warm down with 800m jog
Thursday Rest
Friday 5 miles easy
Saturday 3 miles tempo run
Sunday 6 miles easy. Almost a 10k: your longest run.

WEEK SEVEN - Race day is approaching. A final track session for pace judgement
Monday Rest
Tuesday 4 miles easy
Wednesday Warm up with 10 minutes of easy jogging. Run 3x1600m intervals in 9mins for each 1600m. Slow walk for 400m between each 1600m. Warm down with 800m jog
Thursday Rest
Friday 5 miles easy
Saturday 2 miles easy
Sunday 6 miles easy.

WEEK EIGHT - (Time to taper: save some energy for the race)
Monday Rest
Tuesday 4 miles easy
Wednesday 3 mile tempo run
Thursday 2 miles easy
Friday 2 miles easy
Saturday Rest
Sunday Race day
   

Some explanations for terms used in these schedules

Easy runs: at a pace that feels fairly comfortable. Your breathing will become pronounced but you should be able to carry out a conversation with a training partner.
Speed sessions: consist of short intervals that are run at faster than your normal training speed.
If possible, try to carry out speed sessions at your local running track. If a track is not available get along to a park or playing fields and mark out a loop of close to 400m.
For modern day tracks, your usual training shoes would be sufficient. As a beginner, do not use spiked shoes as injuries could follow.
Rest: an important part of any training schedule. Without Rest, your muscles and tissues will not have an opportunity to recover and strengthen properly.
Fartlek: a distance run interspersed with efforts at speed.
Tempo run: A 25 per cent increase on the speed of your easy runs. Not quite as fast as a track session but an opportunity to raise your game before race day.

 

 

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

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